How are providers satisfying the need for human interaction while promoting self-service?

human interaction vs self service

Written by Geri McGann & Suzy Sliwczynski

In our blog post Can buying a home ever be a true end-to-end online service? we discussed the challenges facing providers when trying to make an online mortgage application a truly digital experience reducing the need to speak to someone directly. We saw within an online mortgage application, making sure they had the right mortgage product was one of the key moments that participants were dropping out of the application funnel. Other industries providers also face this challenge of trying to match a product to the needs of a prospective customer.

Within the health insurance industry, consumers can be faced with over a hundred health plans from which to choose from. In the energy industry, while it’s a lot less, they can still have up to 10 different plans to choose from. So what trends are we seeing that reduce the need for prospects to call a provider, but still provide that important human interaction that many still require to ensure they are getting the product that’s right for them?

We have seen two distinct patterns emerge that seek to reduce direct contact by:

  1. helping prospects choose a product that’s right for them
  2. still provide a human-like interaction

These patterns centre around the use of ‘conversational’ design patterns to help match a product to a user’s need, and the increased uptake of online chat to support customers throughout the acquisition funnel (a feature whose usage and expectation has increased amongst consumers).

Conversational design patterns act as a Q&A-type interaction to help understand user needs and direct them to a suitable product. One of the first initial adopters of this pattern was US health insurer, Oscar, but we are seeing it being implemented by Australian health insurers like Frank, Australian energy providers like Dodo, UK energy company Bulb and Irish health insurer Vhi.

frank dodo bulb vhi

Most providers start by asking a series of questions upfront and then show suitable plans/products. In the Frank example, Frank keeps it to simple initial questions before showing 13 products which might suit. Users can then add additional criteria to reduce this number down further.

Vhi also use it to show prospects how the number of plans available to them initially are reduced by entering criteria that’s specific to them. In the example below we see the number of plans going from 71 to 5.

vhi narrow down quote

These approaches serve to:

  1. not overwhelm users with loads of different options upfront, which make it difficult to know where to start
  2. help users determine what initial criteria is important to them, and from there they can make additional tweaks and alterations to tailor their plan further
  3. help users find a plan in a user-centred way, using language they understand, as opposed to a provider-centric approach where, for example, products might be listed in alphabetical order

A recent Global Reviews mobile study1 of Irish health insurance providers suggests the Vhi model works better when matching to needs with participants having a greater chance of finding a plan that suits their needs and less chance of abandoning.

Online chat is being increasingly sought after by users who are still not confident and need help. For the last four years we have benchmarked 182 brands across 14 industries and have been tracking what users would do if they encountered problems on a website. Online chat is the channel that has seen the largest growth and is an expected channel in almost all the industries we conduct studies in.

Question: If this was a real-life situation and you encountered problems on a website whilst researching, please select what you would do next

Question: If this was a real-life situation and you encountered problems on a website whilst researching, please select what you would do next (online chat)

 

Click Loans – a 100% online mortgage company – provide online chat and also offer other alternative channels referring to them as ‘Talk to a human’.

click loans online chat or talk to a human via phone or skype

Some providers are using the chat model as a complete end-to-end solution. US insurer Lemonade, which offers renters and homeowners insurance online and via mobile, mimics a chat interaction with “Maya” from the beginning of journey. This ‘humanises’ the process making it feel more like a conversation than a form-filling exercise.

Lemonade maya

Making users feel in control and giving them freedom of choice is important however this needs to be balanced by not overwhelming them with choices either.  Conversational design patterns provide a ‘humanistic’ approach to helping users filter and sort through plans and products. But sometimes they need more reassurance when buying particular products and services where they might be locked in for a period of time and/or paying significant sums of money. In this instance an online chat feature can serve to provide timely intervention and help mitigate drop-off even after the consumer has left the site.

Increasingly we are seeing more instances where the chat model is moving beyond the website and into messenger programmes and apps. This enables brands to continue the conversation even when the customer has left the site. This style of chatbot is typically designed to send notifications to customers, update them on their purchases and remind them of upcoming events.

Bank of America has recently launched an AI-powered chatbot powered app called “Erica” who acts as a personal banker. “Erica” marries together self-help tools and customer service, giving consumers a sense of human interaction while also delivering on self-service.

Bank of Ameria Erica

Not all chatbots are humanised in the way that Lemonade’s “Maya” and Bank of America’s “Erica”. UK insurance provider, Aviva, clearly present their chatbot as being just that…a bot. It does, however, still employ a conversational tone making it easy to interact with.

aviva chatbot

Gartner has predicted that “by 2020, customers will manage 85% of their relationship with the enterprise without interacting with a human.” This is not to say that chatbots such as “Erica” will take up 85% of the interactions, but increased use of chatbots will certainly contribute greatly towards the total.

In 2016, 1.6 billion people were using mobile messaging apps, in 2018 that number is expected to reach 2 billion people, or 80% of all smartphone users. This means that the use of chatbots gives businesses a huge opportunity to reach consumers to help drive awareness, acquire customers, provide customer care, and enable transactions.

Whether it be in-site, through specific apps or via Facebook messenger, there is no doubt that chatbots are going to be playing an instrumental role in the future of digital customer service and brand interaction. While providers always need to give users a choice of how they would like to interact with them, they also need to promote self-service and reduce costs. These two patterns provide a nice way to meet both users and business needs.

1Global Reviews Mobile Fruition Ireland Q3 2017 (N=147)

Global Reviews is currently running researching into the digital maturity of brands across a number of industries. Contact us to learn more about how companies are using online chat and what the future holds for digital.

 

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University Series: Understanding how prospective students search on university websites

In this week’s 2 series blog post, we unravel insights from our recent study in the Higher Learning space. The main purpose of carrying out this research, was to find out answers to the way prospective students search for a course on a university website.

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Can buying a home ever be a true end-to-end online service?

Written by Geri McGaan – Principal Client Advisor

Today we don’t give a second thought to buying online. From products like groceries, clothes, and books, to services like TV subscription, flights, and insurance. For most of us, it’s an everyday occurrence. But what about bigger, more significant purchases, where we are parting with large sums of money? Will there come a time when, for example, buying a house online is common place? Is it even realistic to expect someone to make an expensive purchase without talking to someone or at least having some human interaction? Is there even an appetite there from consumers to be able to do it?

Depending on the product or service, the complexity of consumer concerns differ, for example, when buying car insurance, our studies show that the top drivers for choosing a provider at final preference are price and (provider) familiarity (1). However, buying a home is one of the biggest purchases we will make during our life so, more complex questions need addressing such as:

  • How do I get a mortgage and how do I know if I qualify?
  • What type of mortgage is best for me?
  • Which product offers the best interest rate?
  • What do my monthly repayments look like?
  • How much deposit do I have to put down?
  • How long will the application take?

Making buying a home a truly end-to-end process brings with it a wide variety of challenges for providers. In 1981, 22% of home buyers read newspaper ads to find a home and eight percent used friends as an information source. In 2016, 44% looked for properties online first (2). So what about the mortgage application process itself?

A Global Reviews study undertaken in Q3 2016 identified that 26% of participants (N=250) want an end-to-end online mortgage application form service (figure 1), however completing one feels more appropriate at certain stages in their purchase journey and varies depending on their status e.g. a first-time buyer vs a second-time buyer (figure 2).

Figure 1: Please rate how important the following elements would be on a website when deciding on selecting a home loan

Figure 2: When would consumers interact with a home loan provider’s website?

When reviewing the mindset of consumers around online mortgage applications a further study (3) revealed:

  • Most consumers believe that completing an application form online will give conditional approval (with full approval pending confirmation of details of sale and financial details), not full approval. With most expecting to receive an email more so than any other form of communication
  • First home buyers are more likely to use the website to understand their borrowing power rather and seek conditional approval, pending financial and purchase details, however human interaction at some point remains important
  • Having an online application form is not enough of an incentive to encourage consumers to choose a provider, offering discounts on fees and charges makes applying online more appealing for first and second home buyers

So while the home loan providers website has a place, there are still many who want to speak to someone at some stage, regardless of age.

When testing the online application form itself, the highest drop-off for completing an online mortgage application, happens at product selection section, where participants are asked to choose their mortgage. Other issues reported were around duration, terminology, security, and support. With providers looking to cut costs and increase market-share at every stage, if they want to move more complex transaction online, like buying a house, key concerns need to be addressed, such as:

  • Reassuring prospects that the product they have picked is right for them – our study showed that the key moment within the application journey where participants drop-off was at the product selection stage, where participants are asked to choose their product
  • Setting expectations upfront:
    – what are the qualification criteria for applying online – only existing customers?
    – how long can they expect the application to take?
    – what information do they need to have to complete it?
    – how will they be informed of application approval and how long will this take?
  • Providing the appropriate level of help and support at the different stages of the process bearing in mind that first-time buyers may need more hand-holding
  • Being transparent and providing information such as the cool-off period
  • Making them feel their information is safe and secure

But having an online application form is not enough of an incentive for consumers to choose a home loan with that bank – monetary incentives, such as discounts and special rates are more likely to motivate consumers.

What’s likely to influence customers to use an online application form?

So, while some financial institutions are already enabling customers to buy their house online consumers current (and correct) perception (and their expectation) is that most application forms are conditional approval rather than full approval. With many challenges that still need to be overcome providers have some way to go before consumers embrace a fully online end-to-end service from mortgage research, to application, to approval. Totally ‘replacing’ human interaction is not currently realistic. New design patterns are emerging that look at supporting the decision-making process and providing that human-interaction in an online context, but more on that in my next blog…

(1) Global Reviews Fruition Motor Insurance IE October 2017 N=201
(2) Nar Real estate in a Digital Age 2017 Report
(3) Global Reviews Home Loans Application Form AUS March 2017 N=103

Download our free report and view our recent mortgages webinar for more insights into industry trends and how consumers are interacting with provider websites.

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Are we amazed enough by AI?

With the world already waking up to what AI has in store for technology moving forward, the citizenship of Sophia along with her gracing the Jimmy Fallon show has only made our eyes open slightly wider in amazement. Is there anything that technology can’t do?

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The Meme Collider?

human interaction vs self service

In 2012, 174 meters below the Franco/Swiss border in a circular tunnel stretching 27 kilometres, the Higgs boson was discovered, through particle collision. It is through the observation of the by-products of these collisions that scientists and researchers are growing our understanding of the universe.

Can we apply the premise of collision to commercial business models; and through observing the by-product, understand the drivers of social and commercial evolution? May we be able to gain a greater understanding of what CX and customer expectation will look like 5 or even 10 years from now?

If we take, for example, Schiphol airport in the Netherlands who provide parking spots and collided it with the business model of a car rental company who invests in car fleets to rent out, what might we observe? Would we discover a company like ParkFlyRent who pairs departing passengers with those who wish to leave their car at the airport for long periods with inbound passengers looking for a car to rent? The pair never meet but trust is established.

Consider the shape of the ‘peer to peer’ model against this ‘peer to business to peer’ model. What is the role of the business? Is it to provide convenience, to provide a marketplace, or something else?

The ability to throw two markets together and turn them into one without affecting people’s access to mobility is surely the premise upon which market places exist.

Convenience is not key. While it may remove friction in terms of customer experience, it may also remove the customer experience altogether i.e. trust, relationships – the human element.

We are moving towards a world where marketplaces are becoming the dominant place for economic transactions. In the past the marketplace may have been defined as ‘an arena of commercial dealings’. Today these new market places facilitate micro-entrepreneurship that only thrive on positive feedback.

Let’s be contentious, let’s say that insurance companies don’t reward their customers with fair play and caution. When the insurance industry collides with a community based model like a social network, what would we observe?  German Insurance broker Friendsurance.de provide a group based claims cash back bonus structure. They group people online who have a similar insurance policy and if no claims are submitted, the members of the group get a cash bonus at the end of the year. For two consecutive years more than 80% of the consumers who took advantage of the claims free bonus received a proportion of their premiums back. Both the insurance companies and the customers can win.

I suggest that all of these examples come from a quickly growing meme which is the consumer viewpoint of what brands are describing as digital disruption: the collaborate consumption economy. Rachel Botsman, in her TED talk, discusses the fundamentals behind the concept of the collaborative economy and predicts that it will evolve every commercial industry that we know today. In the collaborative economy, trust and relevance are the key drivers and what digital has brought to the table is the ability to build trust without having to meet someone.

It is interesting to note that the definition of a community is “the condition of sharing or having certain attitudes and interests in common”.

Is this collaborate-economy an evolution or a revolution of the marketplace? Is the secret to meeting its challenge to reconsider the linear, consumer to business based model and look to the cluster based community model?

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How can casino game providers improve the journey…and conversions?

Global Reviews recently ran a hugely successful webinar for the ‘Casino’ sector. Below are some key findings but if you would like to find out more click through to the full webinar here.

The casino customer – what do we know about those looking for a casino game to play? 

Casino PlayersGlobal Reviews’ first wave of Fruition research on the casino market revealed that:

  • 91% begin their gaming journey on a search engine.. so it really is !all to play for”!
  • 56% then move from a search engine such as Google to a brand website. Casino brands should ensure their SEO strategy is focused on this customer journey.
  • 75% already have a casino provider in mind before researching.
  • A casino players’ final decision rests on whether they place ‘trust’ in the brand.

Who is winning at the research stage? 

At the research stage, more than half of the casino players who took part in our Fruition research ended up on these Top 4 sites:

Top 4

What were the reasons for final preference for the Top 4 brands? 

Final Preference

Trust and having used the brand before are the main reason for customers when finally choosing a casino provider. Having a website that is visually appealing and providing plenty of options to choose from are also critical.

There are ups and downs along the casino customer journey! 

There are significant ups and downs along the customer journey. Casino providers certainly don’t make it easy. Industry-wide, ‘Channel Selection’ is a low point.

customer journey

So, how can casino game providers improve the customer journey and ultimately increase conversions? Here are our top tips: 

  • Encourage join up
  • Show users WHY they should choose to game with you
  • Show users how EASY it is to play
  • Enable some FREE play on your site
  • Use multiple navigation routes to get players to game quickly and easily – navigate by ‘types of game’, ‘level of jackpot’, ‘name’ and ‘ease of play’
  • Support channel selection by incorporating contextual help and support, including throughout the registration process

To watch the full Casino webinar click here 

Global Reviews specialises in helping top brands worldwide convert more of their ideal customers online, through the use of the most advanced research methodologies. To find out more about how we can help you and your digital teams, or if your Casino brand would like to be included in our next round of FRUITION research, please contact: 

Hannah-Rose Farrington – Commercial Director

T:         +44 (0) 203725 8260

M:        +353 (87) 1263043

E:         hannah.farrington@globalreviews.com

 

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Telco Blog Series: Poor navigation frustrates UK mobile customers

UK mobile phone providers

Global Reviews recent study on the UK Telco market looked at how consumers research and buy a mobile phone, sim card or plan to suit their needs online. The Digital Effectiveness study found that UK mobile providers make the process difficult and confusing for consumers. Poor navigation is one area in which mobile providers are failing their customers.

How are UK Mobile Providers performing? 

Telco Industry Scores

The alarmingly low scores, the lowest being 48% shows us that there are key industry pains.

Where are the ‘Industry Pains’? 

Telco Industry Pains

‘Evaluating Options’ is a key pain for providers in the mobile industry. Essentially ‘Evaluating Options’ equates to “Have you got something to suit my specific needs”? for the mobile customer. In order for customers to be able to evaluate their options quickly and easily, and to find product and plan specifics, navigation needs to be addressed.

‘Online Purchase’ is also a key pain and is discussed further here. 

What do UK mobile customers want? 

  • A product to suit their specific needs at the end of the process
  • A phone on a contract that they can afford
  • An affordable PAYG contract
  • Simply want help to just understand their options

Poor navigation frustrates customers and hinders online purchases 

Task 1 – Consumers in our study were asked to find the cheapest 12 month SIM only contract with 2GB or more of data. This task can be replicated across all of the brands in the market.

Task One

  • Tesco Mobile had a 90% success rate, an 84% satisfaction rate and a 90% evaluation rate
  • In general, UK mobile providers perform poorly on this task.
  • The lowest performing brand had a 32% success rate, a 57% satisfaction rate and a 27% evaluation rate
  • 73% of customers for the lowest performing brand had an issue in finding what was asked in the task
  • Less than one third of customers managed to find the SIM only contract for one particular brand

Task 2 – Customers were asked to find the iPhone with the cheapest Pay Monthly price while having 16GB of storage and a front-facing camera

Task Two

With this task there was a lower success rate.

On average, 61 % of customers had problems finding the phone that matched the specified needs.

  • One brand had an 81% success rate, 70% satisfaction rate and interestingly a 52% evaluation rate
  • One brand in particular had a 0% success rate so nobody managed to find the iPhone on their plan

Voice of the customer suggests frustration 

UK mobile providers do not make it easy to find a particular phone or SIM plan and leads to much frustration amongst customers.

Voice of the customer

Best Practice – Tesco Mobile 

For task one, 90% of customers found the right plan on Tesco mobile with only 10% reporting they had problems doing so.

Tesco Mobile has a simple yet functional and informative table which can be ordered by the top tabs. Customers can decide what is most important and filter options in this way. The page also encourages completion by showing customers the steps along the way therefore encouraging them to buy and to compete the process.

Tesco Mobile

Best Practice – Spark Mobile 

Spark Mobile scored well when we conducted similar research in the Australian market. 52% of customers found success immediately.

A clear page title, relevant terms and labelling and prominent tabs all contribute to a greater task success. Plans and pricing were also clearly labelled from the homepage.

Spark Mobile

  • Tabs labelled according to needs – helps customers to quickly identify each plan type
  • Alternate colouring and bold text used on tabs makes them clear
  • Big, bold text to communicate price – an important factor when matching a plan to needs
  • Clear, consistent headings makes comparing the options quick and easy
  • Insight: Spark visitors encountered the least problems during the match plans to needs task
  • Good comparison tables assist with ‘needs matching’

Best Practice – EDF Energy 

We know that from previous Global Reviews studies, other markets, particularly those with complicated products such as energy retail perform well in these type of tasks. EDF Energy can be used as a ‘Best Practice’ example outside of the Telco industry.Navigation needs to be clear and also needs based. Mobile providers can learn from Energy Retail on how to easily help customers through the process.

EDF Energy

Global Reviews specialises in helping top brands worldwide convert more of their ideal customers online, through the use of the most advanced research methodologies. To find out more about how we can help you and your digital teams, or if your Telco brand would like to be included in our next round of research, please contact us: 

Hannah-Rose Farrington – Commercial Director

T:         +44 (0) 203725 8260

M:        +353 (87) 1263043

E:         hannah.farrington@globalreviews.com

 

 

 

 

 

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Simple tips for current account providers to convert more customers online

Global Reviews recently conducted a study amongst customers who were in-market for a new current account in the UK. As part of the Fruition study, customers were asked to recall current account providers in the UK market, unprompted.

Top 5 Current Account Providers – Recalled 

  1. Santander 53%
  2. Lloyds 51%
  3. Barclays 50%
  4. Natwest 48%
  5. Halifax & HSBC 47%

However, it is interesting to note that after further online research in which customers were asked to shortlist current account providers based on finding the best current account to suit their needs, Nationwide features on top of the shortlisted brands. So somewhere along the customer journey online, Nationwide was found to better match products to needs and in turn was the brand that was shortlisted most in our study.

Top 5 Current Account Providers – Shortlisted

  1. Nationwide 40%
  2. Santander 33%
  3. Natwest 28%
  4. Barclays 25%
  5. Halifax 25%

The reasons why prospective current account holders shortlisted a provider was dependant on convenience and trust. The ‘convenience’ of online banking, coupled with the familiarity and trust in the brand were top of the list for current account customers in the UK.

Reasons for shortlist

These key findings from Global Reviews research reveal the factors which influence customer decision-making online and also provides some insight as to why some brands get selected over others.

What can other Current Account providers learn from Nationwide? 

One key online section that the majority of current account providers miss out on is a well structured and informative “Why Choose Us”. Nationwide very clearly and cleverly provides customers with “6 good reasons” to bank with them.

Nationwide

Final tips to convert more current account customers online: 

Current account providers could easily convert more of their ‘ideal customers’ online by simply adding some useful features and functions such as:

  • Industry awards for their current account product
  • A link to email the current account details to yourself or a friend
  • A link to save the current account to a ‘wish list’ or similar in order to make returning visits easier
  • A guide to choosing the best product for the customer, for example, choosing an account that matches your needs and avoid any excess charges

Simple online features and functions such as those listed above would go a long way in helping prospective customers select the current account that is right for them as well as significantly improving and enhancing the online banking customer experience.

Global Reviews specialises in helping top brands worldwide convert more of their ideal customers online, through the use of the most advanced research methodologies. To find out more about how we can help you and your digital teams, please contact: 

Hannah-Rose Farrington – Commercial Director

T:         +44 (0) 203725 8260

M:        +353 (87) 1263043

E:         hannah.farrington@globalreviews.com

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Web chat? FAQ? Go elsewhere? Preferred methods of support when customers encounter problems online.

Online support

When researching and purchasing a product or service online, there will invariably be situations where a customer will either have questions or encounter problems on the website. There are a multitude of ways in which to answer/solve these problems. Typically, these ways include looking for:

  • FAQs/Help
  • Phone number to call
  • Call me back area
  • Contact us page
  • Web chat
  • Additionally, they could ultimately give up on the company and leave the website in search for another provider.

Between 2014 and 2016, Global Reviews has conducted 114 research studies across the following nine industries in Australia, Ireland and the UK:

  • Banking/Finance
  • Energy Retail
  • General Insurance
  • Health Insurance
  • Higher Learning
  • Sports Betting
  • Superannuation
  • Telecommunications
  • Travel Bookings

In all, 20 products/services within these industries have been assessed against the Global Reviews Digital Sales Effectiveness Benchmark. As part of these benchmarks, 28,268 in-market consumers completed the online sales journey on each of the assessed websites. After completing a series of product research and application tasks, these prospective customers were all asked what they would most likely do if they encounter a problem whilst researching a product/service online.

Across the three regions, it was found that the Irish are less likely to seek out an FAQ/Help page than Australian or British consumers – however it still ranked highly with 20%. This was the preferred method of solving any issues by 24% of Australian and British consumers. The most common method of getting answers for Irish consumers was by looking for a telephone number to call (21%). This method was preferred by 19% of Australians and only 14% of the British.  The use of the telephone appears to be more popular in Ireland not only with making a call, but also in the use of “call-me-back” functions. 11% of Irish preferred this method, compared to 8% in the UK and 7% in Australia.

The use of web chat features rated more prominently for UK sites with 22% preferring this method. Ireland and Australia were a bit lower here with 19% and 18% respectively.

Problems REGION

The differences in what consumers would do if they encountered a problem are not limited to regions, consumer behaviours also differ depending on what product/service they are researching.

Banking & finance

Across the banking and finance sector, help preferences are fairly similar across all products, except for savings accounts where there’s a stronger propensity to seek out FAQs and less of a risk of opting to leave the website and look for another provider.

Problems BANKING

Insurance

Within the insurance sector, travel insurance is a bit of an outlier – most likely due to the short term nature of the policies. There tends to be less of a connection to travel insurance as there is for health, home and motor insurance, with one in five customers opting to find another provider rather than persisting on the website. Despite this higher rate of abandonment,  one in four customers would use FAQs, compared to the one in five for the other insurance products.

Health insurance is slightly above average for seeking out a telephone number and slightly below average for leaving the website.

Problems INSURANCE

Telecommunications, Energy, Higher Learning, Gaming & Travel

Unlike banking and insurance, telecommunications has quite different preferences when customers encounter problems online. Despite internet service providers and mobile phone providers typically being the same company, those looking for a mobile phone provider are more likely to take the self-help route with 30% saying they would look at FAQs/Help compared to the 23% who would do the same when looking for an internet service provider. This means that telecommunication companies need to be catering to differing needs within each area of their website by considering the placement and weighting of help features. What is more important for those looking at mobile phones is different to that of those looking at broadband.

Problems MISCLooking at travel it appears that those looking for domestic flights are more inclined than those looking for international flights to want to speak to someone – whether that be via phone or web chat. This could be due to dealing with local support staff within the same timezone whereas for international flights the staff could be located anywhere depending on the intended destination. This does bring a higher risk factor for international flight sites where 21% of consumers stated that they would leave the site and look for another provider if they encountered a problem.

Unlike other industries, higher learning organisations truly offer unique products which in turn means that prospective students are forced to persevere on the site if they encounter problems unless there is another university that offers the same courses under the same conditions e.g. location. As a result, only 11% said they would leave the site if they had a problem, meanwhile an overwhelming 36% would use FAQs and 27% would look for ‘Contact Us’ information.

What this data shows us is the different research processes customers go through depending on the product or service they are wanting to purchase/apply for. Even within the one brand’s website, there are different wants and needs depending on the product. Therefore, brands need to be aware of the research habits of their customers and tailor each area of their website accordingly.

The alternative is losing these prospective customers to someone else when they give up on a site and go elsewhere.

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4 key challenges of digital transformation…and how Global Reviews can help

Digital Transformation

Marketing Mag recently discussed four key challenges of digital transformation. Essentially these challenges came down to understanding customers, knowing the customer journey, being across the market trends, and being able to make sense of and bring everything together. Some companies are good and one or two of these, but most are still struggling. Digital transformation is fast paced so businesses can’t afford to fall behind the expectation of their customers.

4 key challenges of digital transformation…
and how Global Reviews can help

1. The most vital element in ensuring the success of a digital transformation project involves your company developing empathy with your customers by using research, journey mapping and data analysis.
Global Reviews uses the largest research, data & insights programme in the world to track the online buying behaviour of in-market consumers, the buying decisions they make and the effect that a company’s online customer experience is having on those decisions. We then work with businesses to help them to better understand the wants and needs of their customers through all stages of the research and sales journey.

2. It is critical that business leaders facilitate early on the discussion about what meeting customer’s service expectations really means – ideally before project teams form and work begins.

Our expert client advisory team are on hand to work with businesses through all phases of project development including initial research, best practice audits of wireframes, multi-stage usability testing and benchmark auditing. By having these regular touch points throughout the project, it ensures you are on the right path from the very beginning.

3. Businesses that recognise where the market is heading, understand the opportunities that it presents, and move quickly stand to profit most from digital transformation.
In the 2015/16 financial year, Global Reviews has measured the online acquisition performance of over 500 companies globally and tracked the online buying behaviour of over 60,000 in-market consumers. This places us in a unique position whereby we can deliver industry, local and international trends across the online customer journey which means we can offer a more holistic view on where the marketing is heading.

4. The best businesses develop a conversation about data that is focused on delivering a service to customers. Yes, it is possible to analyse all the data available and use it to create better segmentation and targeting. But that can be a costly and difficult place to start. The best approach is to ask ‘how do we find and use the few data points that will provide value to our customers?

As well as collecting and analysing data to help businesses across all areas of their mobile and desktop websites, Global Reviews provides prioritised recommendations and “quick wins” to build and maintain a stronger online customer experience even if a business is not yet able to invest in a bigger transformation overhaul.

If your brand is facing challenges as you are navigating through a phase of digital transformation, then you are at risk of losing customers to competitors who are further ahead in their transformation. Even if your brand is considered to be #1 within your industry, don’t forget that your customer also has a bank account, energy provider, phone provider and insurance products, so if they’re exposed to something great within one industry, they’re going to expect that level of greatness across all the products and services they use.

Only Global Reviews has insight into the complete picture of your customer, customer journey, industry and full market scope, so contact us today to find out how we can help your business through the process of digital transformation.

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